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I have to admit that I was super excited to get an advance copy of a book (any book) for review. I love to read and learn. That it was a book about health and nutrition was an added bonus. When I began reading The Food Babe Way, my feelings became somewhat put off by the sensationalist style of narration. However, if you can get past this, there is a great deal to be learned from this 21-day program. In this book, Vani Hari gives us a step-by-step guide that allows the reader to create their own best life. For each of the 21 days Ms. Hari describes one new habit to start, including plenty of resources to make this doable. Within these chapters are information on what to drink (and what not to), detoxing from added sugar and cooking at home. There is also flexibility and tips for traveling and dining out. I am particularly pleased to see the emphasis on the quality of food consumed rather than simply the list of what to eat and what to avoid found in many “diet” books. The Food Babe Way is definitely more about creating a healthy, sustainable lifestyle rather than just losing a few extra pounds.

All of this can be found in Part II and Part III of the book. The first 78 pages are dedicated to Food Babe history and an explanation of what chemicals are being added to our food supply. As you may know, Vani Hari is a food activist. Like many activists, she is openly critical of her opposition, in this case the industrialized food industry. I share her frustration with these companies and the government that allows them to add known toxins to our food. However, I am concerned that her “Fox News” style of writing will have many people putting this book down before they get to the good part.Here is an example:

As you scroll down the aisles of the grocery store, start thinking about the shelves of boxed, canned, jarred, and packaged foods as caskets holding dead food. It’s all embalmed with preservatives that will make you feel dead, too.

I think there could be better ways of getting her point across than with comments such as these. Then again, I may be wrong as her inflammatory style has led to changes such as the removal of artificial dyes in SOME Kraft Mac n’ Cheese products and other positive changes. Perhaps the only way to get national change is by being loud and in the face of these companies. Vani Hari makes no pretense about being any other way and that comes through in her writing. I have to admire the honesty in this.

In the end, I would recommend this book for those just beginning their health food journey. Whether or not you follow all of 21 recommendations (I don’t), you will undoubtedly learn how to read a label and where to look for good, healthy food. There are also 40 pages for recipes to try. If they are all as good as her Melt In Your Mouth Kale Salad, you will enjoy learning to eat healthy. If you are not new to avoiding processed foods you will find some great reminders, travel tips and fantastic recommended reading and resource list at the end of the book.

You can buy the book, starting today at www.thefoodbabeway.com or on Amazon.

The Food Babe Way – book review

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